A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production
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Old 07-07-2012, 12:00 PM   #1
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Icon5 A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Introduction:

This is for the person starting out on their electronic music making journey, who doesn't know where to start or what's what. It's a brief introduction to the hardware and software you'll most likely want to consider when setting up your studio (even if it is your bedroom). Remember - this is just a guide to one particular kind of set-up; there are many other ways of doing things .

Use what you've got! When you make the most of what you have at hand, you'll soon develop a sense for what you need.



The Computer:

The essential ingredient in this set-up, and more than likely the one you've got right now should be adequate to get started with. The Mac vs Pc debate is going to be down to you: What you're used to and what you can afford. Generally a Mac is going to be what it is straight out the box, whereas you could custom build a Pc for much less, and use the money for other things.

If you're going to buy a new computer, or upgrade components:
  • Good memory and CPU:
32-bit Windows can only use up to 4gb of memory; 64-bit doesn't have that limitation. So obviously - having a 64-bit system means that your applications have access to much more memory = better performance. Bear in mind though - that the software you use has to be 64-bit compatible in order to take advantage of that extra memory. If you have a 64-bit system you can still run 32-bit applications on it, but you can't run 64-bit applications on a 32-bit Operating system.
  • Solid State Drive (SSD)
As there are no moving components, these hard-drives provide for extremely fast read / write speeds, which makes working with audio much better. As SSD's are quite expensive, it might be a good idea to have a regular hard-drive with a large storage capacity to back-up onto, and load your programs onto the SSD.

Remember to back up your projects!

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Software:

The DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) is the program with which you're going to be creating your music. For the most part, you'll be doing everything inside this program, from recording sounds to arranging and manipulating them. It's therefore important that you choose software that you'll enjoy using. It would be a good idea to read what other peoples' opinions are, and to pick the two programs that most appeal to you and to try out a demo version and see what you prefer. It's pointless denying that a lot of people making electronic music use Ableton and FL Studio, so check those out, but remember that there are loads of other applications out there that you might actually prefer.

Many packages also offer a lite version, which is usually the full-version of the software, but with limitations (like only having 10 tracks for example).

FL Studio | Logic | Ableton Live

A quick note on Vsti's / Vst's: These are plugins that you load from within your DAW which basically act as either instruments or effects. There are plenty free one's around to get you going, and there are plenty expensive ones around to empty your pocket.

TAL-Elekro Vsti instument | Smartelectronic AMBIENCE Vst plugin (reverb effect)

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The Audio Interface:

The Audio Interface in an external soundcard that provides different types of audio inputs and outputs, and offers better/faster processing of audio. It'll connect to your computer with either USB or Firewire, though USB is becoming more common in the home-studio sized interfaces. The main consideration when choosing your interface (apart from what you can afford) is what you're going to want to connect to and from it.


The devices you'll be connecting to it will most likely be mics or instruments (guitars, synth etc.). Most Audio interfaces should offer at least two multi-purpose inputs for either an XLR connector (usually associated with mics) or a standard jack input (the kind of connector used to connect a guitar to an amp). Coming from the Audio Interface will most likely be speakers and headphones. There's usually a dedicated Left / Right output for speakers and a seperate headphone output (with it's own volume control).


Audio interface with mic/instrument inputs on the front & volume controls, and multiple inputs and outputs on the rear of the unit.


Monitors:

When making music you want to listen to it on speakers which deliver the sound without changing its characteristics, so that you can make the best mixing decisions. Monitor speakers differ from regular hi-fi speakers in that they attempt to deliver as flat a response as possible, meaning they try to deliver as true a sound as possible. Hi-fi speakers might, for example, make the bass more pronounced or affect other frequency ranges in drastic or subtle ways.

Read reviews and listen to as many as possible with your own music / music you enjoy, before buying.

There are other factors to consider such as placement of the speakers and treating the room with things like acoustic foam in order to prevent sounds from bouncing around the place. This is a huge topic - too much to be covered in detail here!

(left) Popular entry-level monitors Rockit KRK 8's | (right) Classic Yamaha ns-10's
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For the beginner on a budget, these might be more important than monitors. They're cheaper and they offer extremely good audio quality. They're a good way to get to know your sound, and also to form an opinion on what you might want in studio monitors. As with monitors, studio headphones differ from regular headphones in that they offer a flat response to the audio signal - attempting to deliver the audio to your ears as unaffected as possible.

The 3 main kinds are open, closed and semi-open. Closed has a completely closed cup, so no sounds escape. On an open headphone the back of the cup is open to allow sound to escape but it also allows for some airflow. Semi-open is a bit of both worlds. If you're recording vocals and using open headphones with high levels, then your mic might just pick up that sound which escapes from the headphones.


A midi controller doesn't produce any sound on it's own. What it does do, is tell the device it's connected to, what to do. So if the midi controller is connected to your computer, and you have your DAW running and you've got an instrument loaded, then pressing a key or button on the midi controller will send a message telling your computer to play a particular note in a particular octave.

Then there are midi controllers with knobs, dials, slides and other controls. What these usually do is control various aspects of the DAW. So you could, for example, assign the fader on your midi controller to control the Master volume in your DAW. These controls can be assigned to whatever you choose, and so it allows you to interact with your software in a way that suits you.

Almost all midi controllers come with editing software which will allow you to change the messages that the various keys, buttons & knobs on the midi controller send. In this way you can further tailor the device to your own liking. Midi controllers are great for live performances in order to free you up from having to click your way through a performance, and it affords a lot more expressiveness than a mouse and keyboard might.


Novation Nocturn controller | Korg padKontrol | Behringer BCR2000

On the left is a typical controller. It has keys which send note information, as well as a pitch and mod wheel. But it also has various knobs and buttons which can be assigned to functions in the DAW. In the middle is a typical pad controller...usually assigned to drum sounds. The pads are velocity sensitive, meaning that the harder you hit them, the louder they'll tell the computer to trigger the sound. On the right is a controller with no keys or pads - it's sole purpose is to control the various aspects of your DAW that you assign the knobs to.

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Last edited by scyn; 01-28-2014 at 03:11 PM.. Reason: revised

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Old 07-07-2012, 12:00 PM   #2
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

If anyone has anything else they think should be added to this, please let me know. Especially if you have a good link to accompany a particular section of this guide.
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Old 07-07-2012, 03:17 PM   #3
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

This is quality. Nice work! This will be an easy link to send new people to that are this green.

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Old 07-07-2012, 03:48 PM   #4
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

WOW I can remember going through all of that in the first post during my early days. The trip from there to here has been amazing though - and for any of you that are just starting to make music now I wish you all the best of luck - it is a wonderful journey - and a lot of hard work but you will get there.
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Old 07-07-2012, 03:56 PM   #5
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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Originally Posted by Sublight View Post
WOW I can remember going through all of that in the first post during my early days. The trip from there to here has been amazing though - and for any of you that are just starting to make music now I wish you all the best of luck - it is a wonderful journey - and a lot of hard work but you will get there.

Yea. That's a good point. I remember not knowing anything for years and just experimenting, and never getting much of anywhere, using my component hifi system to monitor on. I didn't have internet at home during graduate school and never really got to look much up.

The best was the Christmas break I spent mostly alone in my apartment waiting on my copy of FL Studio...I was using the demo and couldn't save patches or projects so I'd bounce everything to audio and arrange it in Acid. I'd set up my studio in the kitchenette of my apartment and chucked the table over by the front door. I could watch it snowing, face lit up by the monitor. Awesome times.

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Old 07-07-2012, 08:20 PM   #6
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Really nice thread! Looks great, and has good info.

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Old 07-08-2012, 06:15 PM   #7
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Someone should add some stuff about setting up MIDI controllers to work with other synths and things.

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Old 07-08-2012, 09:24 PM   #8
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

I only have a computer, and headphones. i wish i could have a midi controller D: or even a mixer for gods sake.

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Old 07-08-2012, 09:49 PM   #9
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

I think an external mixer is a pretty good idea, too. Especially for recording and monitoring hardware/external instruments/mics and vocals. imo.

Last edited by Jazzyspoon; 07-08-2012 at 09:55 PM..

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Old 07-08-2012, 10:06 PM   #10
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Buying my first mixer, many, many years ago, changed my music more than one other thing I've ever purchased.

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Old 07-09-2012, 03:04 AM   #11
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

i need an external mixer and a midi keyboard controller EDM why u so spensive to make!!
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Old 07-09-2012, 08:16 AM   #12
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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Originally Posted by D_Davis View Post
Buying my first mixer, many, many years ago, changed my music more than one other thing I've ever purchased.
Interesting. I take it you were running quite a bit of hardware through it - more than the Audio Interface could accommodate?
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Old 07-09-2012, 09:14 AM   #13
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Maybe the next lesson would be how to use it. Like your sounds come from synths, samplers, or an input sound source, and go through effects. How a mixer works, sequencing etc.

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Old 07-09-2012, 09:33 AM   #14
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

exellent work Scyn , now we need the same thing about wobble

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Old 07-11-2012, 12:08 AM   #15
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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Interesting. I take it you were running quite a bit of hardware through it - more than the Audio Interface could accommodate?
Yes. Back in those days, it was all hardware! Home recording set-ups consisted of 4-tracks and 8-tracks. Hard Disc recording was a think of the distant future!

And there were no audio interfaces.

Being able to create an f/x loop with all of my pedals and then route different keyboards and drum machines through the loop simultaneously was a game changer.

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Old 07-13-2012, 03:29 AM   #16
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

This is a great guide/thread, especially for me. I am starting at making EM, and strictly for this I bought:

- i7 quad-core 4GB 500GB 15" Mac, working Ableton Live
- 2 YamahaHS80 monitors (amazing)
- Presonus Audiobox 22vsl Audio Interface
- ATH-40 Headphones

I will probably buy the cheapest 49 key midi controller out there because, as you can probably tell, I am BROKE after purchasing all this gear hahah. Space is also a very big issue, I don't even know where I'll put future gear such as mixer, mic, and still have space on my desk to study audio engineering/production that I'll start taking next week. (I'm excited to say the least). I'm just saying all this as reference gear for others, I know that this wouldve helped me a lot a while back. as i said great thread let's keep this one going

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Old 07-13-2012, 10:46 AM   #17
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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I will probably buy the cheapest 49 key midi controller out there...
My first and current midi keyboard is also a rather cheap one (Novation Remote 49 LE, which is the 49-key version of [Only registered and activated users can see links. Click here to register]
), and I can't see myself replacing it until it breaks. Does the job, I prefer the non-weighted keys and after setting everything up with the editor, it works really well in my Live set.

Good luck with your set-up .

Last edited by scyn; 07-13-2012 at 05:02 PM..
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Old 07-20-2012, 12:26 AM   #18
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

Thanks for the thread! I figure I should post this here instead of starting a new thread. I recently started to make some EM and right now I'm borrowing a friend's MPK25. In a few weeks or so I should be able get some things. I've already got the computer, Ableton, and headphones (monitors aren't practical for me). I've also got a keyboard picked out, and I was looking at also getting another midi controller to compliment it. I'm leaning to a Novation Launchpad, but I wondering about the Akai MPD26. Which one is more versatile/useful? Any other suggestions?

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Old 07-24-2012, 10:31 AM   #19
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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I'm leaning to a Novation Launchpad, but I wondering about the Akai MPD26. Which one is more versatile/useful? Any other suggestions?
The launchpad is definitely more geared toward a live setup, though it can be useful in a production environment. It hasn't got velocity sensitive buttons, so it's not that great for bashing out a beat, but it is really cool for triggering things and just generally executing a live set. The MPD26 will be much more like an instrument, in that the harder you hit the buttons, the louder the sound will be...and it's buttons are much easier to hit than the little launchpad buttons.

I'd just stick with the keyboard for now and buy additional controllers as the need arises. You might even find that you'd like a bigger keyboard.

Last edited by scyn; 07-24-2012 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 07-30-2012, 03:57 PM   #20
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Re: A Beginners guide to Electronic Music Production

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The launchpad is definitely more geared toward a live setup, though it can be useful in a production environment.
The Launchpad is fantastic in a production environment! You can use it for all sorts of things. In Session Mode and Session View you can launch scenes, clips, groups, several clips, all without touching the mouse or looking at the computer. You can use it as a mixer, drum machine, and controller of virtually anything. I got one recently and it was a revelation. I took the song I was working on back to Session.

Here I can play it from start to finish in one go, play some tracks and automation in Arrange while launching scenes in Session (there is a way), play loops and scenes in different orders and combinations. I can try ideas out in ways I couldn't in Arrange, and compare different bits of the song next to each other to make sure I've not lost the groove. I wish I'd got one earlier.

I've taught mine to flash green lights on the trk on button during every 8th bar so I know where I'm up to.

There's also a lot to be said for not looking at the screen and holding a mouse as much from an ergonomic/health point of view as well as a creative one.

Quote:
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It hasn't got velocity sensitive buttons, so it's not that great for bashing out a beat
I beg to differ. I think the Launchpad is brilliant for tapping out beats. Even I can do it. Not everyone wants velocity sensitivity for that. Easier to start with everything at 100 and then alter a few beats if necessary. Let's face it, most of your hits are gonna be 100 anyway.

Last edited by funken; 07-30-2012 at 04:05 PM..

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